Why should most long-term investors invest in multiple countries?

Why should most long-term investors invest in multiple countries?

Today’s investors are wildly enthusiastic about America’s all-conquering technology companies, such as Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon. These companies are either shielded from the threat of takeover by special shareholder structures or, in the case of Amazon, have persuaded investors that long-term growth is more important than short-term profits. Other countries only wish they could create technology giants with the same reach as one of America’s titans.

Why are most people bad at investing?

Why are most people bad at investing?

In our previous blogs, we have provided theoretical and empirical evidence that broad-based indices outperform most active managers (see here, here and here). In this blog, we argue that the average investor in the U.S. significantly underperforms broad-based indices. Dalbar’s (2017 QAIB Report) analysis shows that the 30-year annualized S&P 500 return was 10.16% while the 30-year annualized return for the average S&P500 investor was only 3.98% -- a gap of 6.18% annualized.